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Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: la Mûre to Serre-Chevalier

A guide to Stage 17 of the Tour de France 2017, which is 183km from la Mûre to Serre-Chevalier. The stage begins with a climb of the Col d'Ornon, then a descent to Allemont. Next up is the Col de la Croix de Fer, after which the riders descend to Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne. The climax of the stage is an ascent of the Col du Télégraphe, swiftly followed by the Col du Galibier (2,642m). Then it's downhill to the finish at Serre-Chevalier (1,403m). Read about Stage 17 of the Tour de France 2017 here.

Roglic wins in Serre Chevalier on Stage 17

19th July 2017

Primoz Roglic (Lotto Jumbo NL) won Stage 17 from a breakaway, moving ahead alone on the Col du Galibier. Rigoberto Uran took a 6s bonus for second place, and moves into second overall. Froome took 4s for third. Fabio Aru lost time.

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: facts, figures, and map

Stage 17 of the Tour de France 2017 starts at la Mûre, and takes the riders on a tough route over four major climbs. There's a descent to Serre-Chevalier to finish the day.

Stage classification Mountain
Distance 183km
Intermediate sprint Allemond
Climbs Col d'Ornon (Category 2)
Col de la Croix de Fer (hors catégorie)
Col du Télégraphe (Category 1)
Col du Galibier (hors catégorie)

This is the official map of Stage 17.

The official Tour de France stage profile for Stage 17:

Profile of Stage 17, Tour de France 2017

Profile of Stage 17, Tour de France 2017, © ASO/Tour de France

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: date & timings

Stage 17 takes place on Wednesday 19th July 2017.

The publicity caravan sets off from La Mûre at 10h10, and arrives at the finish at Serre Chevalier at 15h57. The peloton rolls over the start line as a cohesive mass at 12h10, and splintered fragments cross the finish line between 17h17 and 17h57.

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: the route

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: the start at la Mûre

View of the Drac from la Mûre railway

View of the Drac from la Mûre railway, by Archangel12, Licence CC BY 2.0

The stage starts at la Mûre, place des Capucins. 10,000 to 15,000 people are expected, according to the town hall:

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: la Mûre to Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne

Col de la Croix de Fer

Col de la Croix de Fer, by Florian Pépellin, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The riders leave la Mûre, and take the D526 to Valbonnais (on the river Bonne, and formerly a cement-producing town), Entraigues, and le Périer (on the river Malsanne; near the village, there's a waterfall called the Cascade de Confolens). 

Le Périer

Le Périer, by Eporte, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The route is then on up to the Col d'Ornon (1,371m), with the Taillefer (2,857m) to the left, and the Pic du Col d'Ornon (2,872m) up to the right. From the Col, Stage 17 descends past the village of Ornon to la Paute (near le Bourg-d'Oisans) in the Romanche valley. Here, the riders turn left on the D1091, before turning right shortly afterwards to Allemont.

Profile of the intermediate sprint at Allemont on Stage 17 TDF 2017

The intermediate sprint is at Allemont.

Lac de Grand-Maison

Lac de Grand-Maison, by Zehnfinger, Licence CC BY-SA 2.5

From Allemont, the riders begin the climb of the Col de la Croix de Fer. They take the D526 alongside the Eau d'Olle, past the ski resort of Vaujany, through the Défilé de Maupas (with the Montagne des Sept Laux to the right), past the Barrage de Grand-Maison, and the lake created by the barrage, the Lac de Grand-Maison. The route now leaves the Isère département and enters the Savoie, and continues through the Combe d'Olle to the Chalet Col du Glandon (which is close to the Col du Glandon itself). 

La Croix de Fer

The iron cross at the top of the Col de la Croix de Fer, by Florian Pépellin, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

The riders turn right on the D926 up to the Col de la Croix de Fer (2,067m).

Profile of the Col de la Croix de Fer 

Profile of the Col de la Croix de Fer, © ASO/Tour de France

The descent from the Col de la Croix de Fer involves a number of hairpin bends, and takes the peloton through Saint-Sorlin-d'Arves, and past the ski resorts of Saint-Jean-d'Arves and Fontcouverte-la-Toussuire to Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, in the Maurienne valley.

Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne

Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, by Semnoz, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne to the Col du Galibier

Col du Galibier

Col du Galibier, by Robbie Shade, Licence CC BY 2.0

Stage 17 heads along the Maurienne valley floor, by the river Arc, and going upstream so slightly uphill, to Saint-Michel-de-Maurienne, where the next climb(s) begin.

Profile of Cols du Télégraphe & Galibier

Profile of the Col du Télégraphe & Col du Galibier, © ASO/Tour de France

The climb out of Saint-Michel-de-Maurienne is of the Col du Télégraphe. There are lots of twists and turns through the trees, and an average gradient of 7.1% over 11.9km.

Fort du Télégraphe

Fort du Télégraphe, near the Col du Télégraphe, by L archi, Licence CC BY 1.0

After the summit of the Col du Télégraphe, there's a short respite (4.5km), because the road to Valloire is slightly downhill.

Valloire

Valloire, by S73yoyo, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

From Valloire, the road tilts up again, this time for the climb of the Col du Galibier. It's relatively - relatively - gentle to begin with, and gets steeper in the last 5km, after the restaurant at plan Lachat. The average gradient is 6.9% over 17.7km. 

Top of the Col du Galibier

Top of the Col du Galibier, by Graham van der Wielen, Licence CC BY 2.0

The striking Aiguilles d'Arve are up to the right during the climb.

Aiguilles d'Arves

The Aiguilles d'Arve seen from Val Thorens, photo by ValThorensGuide...is it possible that Val Thorens could be on the route of the Tour de France 2018?

At the Col du Galibier, the race leaves Savoie, and enters the Hautes Alpes département.

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: Col du Galibier to the finish at Serre-Chevalier

Serre-Chevalier

Serre-Chevalier cable car in summer, by Rob, Licence CC BY-SA 2.0

From the Col du Galibier, it's downhill to the Col du Lautaret. 

Col du Lautaret

Col du Lautaret, by Soumei Baba, Licence CC BY 2.0

From the Col du Lautaret, the Stage 17 route continues down the Vallée de la Guisanne to le Monêtier-les-Bains and Villeneuve-la-Salle-les-Alpes, both part of the ski resort of Serre-Chevalier. It seems that the finish line of Stage 17 will be in Villeneuve-la-Salle-les-Alpes.

La Salle-les-Alpes

La Salle-les-Alpes, by O. Taris, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: favourites for the stage win

Chris Froome & John Kerry

Chris Froome & John Kerry, August 2016 (public domain)

Stage 17 is a chance for the climbers and GC contenders. You'd expect there to be a select group out front at the top of the Col du Galibier, including the GC favourites - maybe Fabio Aru, Simon Yates, Nairo Quintana, Romain Bardet, Rigoberto Uran, and Chris Froome, plus a few others perhaps. 

After he showed us his amazing descending skills on the 2016 Tour, Stage 17 of the 2017 event could lead to a win for Froome the zoom. Romain Bardet is almost certainly a better descender, though, and could have something to say about that.

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: comments

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Stage 18, Tour de France 2017

Casse Désérte - Col d'Izoard

Casse Déserte, Col d'Izoard, by Stephen Colebourne, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Stage 18 of the Tour de France 2017 is 179.5km from Briançon to Izoard. The last Alpine stage finishes on the steep slopes of the Casse Déserte.

Read about Stage 18, Tour de France 2017.

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: towns, sights and attractions

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: la Mûre

La Mûre railway

La Mûre railway, by Archangel12, Licence CC BY 2.0

La Mûre is a town on the plateau de la Matheysine, in the Isère département of France.

The name la Mûre comes from a pre-Celtic root, mor or mur, meaning rocky promontory or hill. The town's name therefore derives from the rocky hill on which the first castle was built here, and has nothing to do with blackberries or ripeness (other meanings of the word mure in French).

La Mûre is known for being on the route Napoléon - the road Napoléon Bonaparte took on escaping from his first exile on the island of Elba, in the Mediterranean. (This period was Bonaparte's Hundred Days, which ended with defeat at Waterloo, and exile for a second time in the south Atlantic, on Saint Helena).

In summer, a tourist train runs on the line formerly used to transport coal mined in la Mûre to Saint-Georges-de-Commiers.

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne

Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne

Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, by Florian Pépellin, Licence CC BY-SA 3.0

Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne is a town at the confluence of the Arvan with the Arc. It's named after John the Baptist, and reputedly had relics of John - three fingers brought back from Egypt in the C6th.

The main industries in Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne are aluminium production and tourism

Stage 17, Tour de France 2017: Serre-Chevalier

Serre-Chevalier

Serre-Chevalier, by the Office de Tourisme de Serre-Chevalier, Licence CC BY-ND 2.0

Serre Chevalier is a ski resort in the Hautes-Alpes. Serre-Chevalier is really the name for the ski area, which groups together the town of Briançon with the villages of Monêtier-les-Bains, Chantemerle, and Villeneuve. There are lifts from all of these places up to the ski area.

In summer, there's kayaking, walking, mountain biking, rock climbing, paragliding, and other activities.

Col de la Croix de FerCol du GalibierSerre-Chevalier cable car in summer

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